LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit


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Because the Father is trinitarian, relating to the Son and the Spirit, the Word and Wisdom, he can create all things without the need for an angelic mediator, just as the title of his final section implies: 51 Interestingly, Ephesians 2.

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For God did not stand in need of these [beings], in order to the accomplishing of what He had Himself determined with Himself beforehand should be done, as if He did not possess His own hands. First, this is a contradiction of Gen 1. This assistance can not come through the agency of angels since, as finite and created beings, they could not create the image of the infinite and uncreated God. To be sure, a host of angels were present with God, marveling at his creation Job While the plural subject is not commonly used in Scripture to designate the Trinity, to interpret it as such need not be an instance of affective fallacy.

With the presence of the Spirit in Gen 1. Third, God had no need for any help since he is eternally self-sufficient as a Triune God. Divine Personal Omnipotence: Implications of the Two Hands Gunton points out that Irenaeus was the first to systematically develop the omnipotence of God in the history of dogmatics.

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Thus, Chrysostom likely interpreted this text correctly when he identified the imago Dei as a functionary vice-regent who is commanded to imitate the rule of his King. Have we not all one Father? In both the cosmic and christological case there is a distinct ontological divide functioning that only avoids collapse into monism by virtue of the fact that God himself prevents such a collapse through the mediating activity of the Son and the Spirit. But by virtue of his triune nature, God the Father is able to enter into personal relations with the created order by the mediating activity of his two hands, the Son ad the Spirit.

Instead, Jesus harnesses his power for the good of people and creation. And Thou hast made them to be a kingdom and priests to our God; and they will reign upon the earth. Greek gods were not omnipotent, but subservient to fate, chance and necessity. Caird, The Revelation of St. John Peabody: Hendrickson, , p. This awakens in us the deep desire to reach heaven, the eternal home which He offers us as His adopted sons and special friends.

The holy angels share in His glory. He sent them out to all those who are to inherit salvation. He reveals them to us who cannot see them. He shows us His heavenly army of faithful servants who do His will, who are always ready for any service to our benefit us and of those who are with us. We reflected before the Eucharistic Year about the holy angels in the Psalms cf. If we reckon the Book of Tobit with the miraculous presence of St. Raphael cf. Circulars of January to September , among the Historical Books, then we find only a few references to the angels in the rest of the Wisdom Literature.

We may better understand why this should be if we survey the books of Scripture in the light of their principal author, the Blessed Trinity. Therefore, it is reasonable to relate the three different groups of books somehow to the three divine Persons. God the Father is the origin without origin. Due to this primary inner-trinitarian position, the work of creation is appropriated to Him.


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His action is, therefore, very much related to existence itself, to Being as a base for all that follows from it. To Him, then, is also attributed the manner of communicating through actions and facts, through natural events or historical development. And in this line of thought, we might also somehow attribute to Him the Historical Books of the Old Testament see the Circular Letters from through The Holy Spirit is the divine witness to the generation and mission of the Son, of the love of the Father.

As such, His activity in creation is important; He can become our guide. This is the actual companionship which mankind experiences in the life of the people of Israel through the Prophets, and then of course, much more so in the life of the Church. We have yet to look at the message on the angels in the Prophetic Books.


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    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus  Reflections on the Holy Spirit LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit
    LOOKING FOR ANGELS: Saint Irenaeus Reflections on the Holy Spirit

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